Traditional Artist Prompts for Midjourney

Midjourney can generate a specific art style when you add one or more artist names to your prompts. This doesn’t usually generate art that looks like it was drawn by that artist exactly; at least at this point, you will still be able to tell the difference. It’s more like the AI is looking at that artist’s work and then draws something inspired by that style—just like what a real-life artist might do. To understand better what Midjourney is doing here, I’ve included a thumbnail of 1-3 original art pieces by the artist next to what Midjourney will generate when you use their name as a prompt.

The prompts I used to generate the Midjourney art on the right were: “character by [artist name] –ar 2:3” and “landscape by [artist name] –ar 16:9”.

Artist

Original Art

Midjourney Art

This is the default look of Midjourney without adding any other parameters.

Albert Bierstadt

1830 – 1902

Alphonse Mucha

1860 – 1939

Andy Warhol

1928 – 1987 

Arthur Rackham

1867 – 1939

Auguste Renoir

1841 – 1919

Austin Briggs

1908 – 1973

Bob Ross

1942 – 1995

Cicely Mary Barker

1985 – 1973

Claude Monet

1840 – 1926

Dante Rossetti

1828 – 1882

Dean Cornwell

1892 – 1960

Edgar Degas

1834 – 1917

Edmund Dulac

1882 – 1953

El Greco

1541 – 1614

Eugene Boudin

1824 – 1898

Frank Frazetta

1928 – 2010

Frida Kahlo

1907 – 1954

Hiroshi Yoshida

1876 – 1950

Hubert Robert

1733 – 1808

Ilya Repin

1844 – 1930

Ivan Aivazovsky

1817 – 1900

James C. Christensen

1942 – 2017

J.C. Leyendecker

1874 – 1951

Jules Bastien-Lepage

1848 – 1884

Katsushika Hokusai

1760 – 1849

Leonardo da Vinci

1452 – 1519

Louis Comfort Tiffany

1848 – 1933

Rembrandt

1606 – 1669

Tasha Tudor

1915 – 2008

Titian

1488 – 1576

Vincent Van Gogh

1853 – 1890

William Blake

1757 – 1827

Winslow Homer

1836 – 1910